I covered this in my last two posts, but the Spek language that I’ve been slowly working on over the past few months is based on the Axum programming language originally developed by Microsoft about five years ago. I’ve been making changes to the Axum language’s grammar after spending a couple of weeks painstakingly trying to recreate it. The area I’m working to change at the moment are channels and ports.

To recap where we are: channel patterns are entirely out, channel ports have been updated, channel functions just came back from vacation, and a couple of feature ideas for channels in the future to share.Continue reading

I covered this a bit in my last post, but the Spek language that I’ve been slowly working on over the past few months is based on the Axum programming language originally developed by Microsoft about five years ago. I’ve been making changes to the Axum language’s grammar after spending a couple of weeks painstakingly trying to recreate it. The area I’m working to change at the moment are channels and ports.

To recap where we are: channel patterns are entirely out and channel functions are on holiday until further notice.Continue reading

I haven’t touched the Spek project in a few weeks and decided to give it some attention tonight. In playing with Java, Ruby, Python, and Node.js over the past couple of months, I’ve wondered what sort of additional syntax or overall languages changes I should consider before finishing the grammar.

The Spek language is pretty much a duplicate of the Axum language developed by Microsoft back in 2009. I’ve only made a really small change to the syntax for how a developer would interact with a channel and possible network operators, but the rest of the language is exactly the same so far.Continue reading